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May 2 @ 6:00 pm

Emily Lodge reads from her new book The Falcon Diaries

An American writer joins her husband, a contractor/consultant working in Iraq, to live in Amman, Jordan, and keeps a diary of day-to-day events. Out of this emerge so many stories of the pain and frustration of a forgotten world, which precedes the Iraq war, dating from a half-century earlier—the Palestinians who fled Israel in the ’48 and ’67 wars. In both cases — whether the Iraqi war or the Israeli-Palestinian conflict — she finds herself squarely within the enemy camp and seeks to find out why that is, delving into the history and layering it within the quotidian.

Start: May 2 @ 6:00 pm
End: May 2 @ 7:30 pm

May 8 @ 6:00 pm

Laura Jacobs reads from her new book Celestial Bodies

As much as we may enjoy Swan Lake or The Nutcracker, for many of us ballet is a foreign language. It communicates through movement, not words, and its history lies almost entirely abroad-in Russia, Italy, and France. In Celestial Bodies, dance critic Laura Jacobs makes the foreign familiar, providing a lively, poetic, and uniquely accessible introduction to the world of classical dance. Combining history, interviews with dancers, technical definitions, descriptions of performances, and personal stories, Jacobs offers an intimate and passionate guide to watching ballet and understanding the central elements of choreography.

Beautifully written and elegantly illustrated with original drawings, Celestial Bodies is essential reading for all lovers of this magnificent art form.

Start: May 8 @ 6:00 pm
End: May 8 @ 7:30 pm

May 10 @ 6:00 pm

Elizabeth Winthrop reads from her new novel The Mercy Seat

Winthrop tells the arresting tale—from multiple points of view—of a community locked in struggle with itself. Set during the hours leading up to the scheduled execution of a young black man for the alleged rape of a white woman in 1943 small-town Louisiana, Winthrop expertly captures the intimacy and tension of a town, its people, and its injustices.

On the eve of his execution by electric chair, eighteen-year-old Willie Jones sits in his cell in New Iberia awaiting his end. Across the state, a flatbed truck driven by a convict and his keeper carries the executioner’s chair from its home at the state penitentiary in Angola. On a nearby highway, Willie’s father Frank is hauling a gravestone for his son in a wagon pulled by his aged, fading mule. In his office the District Attorney who prosecuted Willie reckons with the sentencing and his own conscience, while at a gas station at the crossroads outside of town, married couple Ora and Dale grapple with their grief and their secrets.As the members of the township reflect on the implications of Willie’s upcoming execution, an intricately layered portrait of a community emerges, bearing the deep stain of the color line.  Moving from voice to voice, Winthrop elegantly conveys both the ugly realities and the touching intimacies of a small town and its residents. The Mercy Seat is a brutally smart and tender novel from one of our most acute literary observers.

Start: May 10 @ 6:00 pm
End: May 10 @ 7:30 pm

May 15 @ 6:00 pm

Elizabeth Barlow Rogers presents her new book Saving Central Park

Start: May 15 @ 6:00 pm
End: May 15 @ 7:30 pm

May 31 @ 6:00 pm

Adam Van Doren presents his new book The Stones of Yale

What makes a university great? Its faculty? Its students? Its curriculum? All three to be sure. But also its architecture. Great buildings inspire. They transform how we think, how we see, how we learn—how we act. No one who enters the cathedral of Chartres is the same person coming out.

Too often architectural critics focus on theory and analysis of a building rather than the visceral experience of seeing it and being in it. Van Doren is more interested in the stories, in how Yale’s buildings made people feel, not just the academic origins of their style or where their bricks were made. What was it like to live in them, to study in them? What did people remember?

Painter Adam Van Doren speaks to Yale alumni as diverse as actor Sam Waterston, writers Christopher Buckley and David McCullough, Yale librarian Judith Schiff, former NFL great Calvin Hill, architect Cesar Pelli among others, and illustrates his book in gorgeous watercolor paintings of the buildings of Yale that interest him most.

Start: May 31 @ 6:00 pm
End: May 31 @ 7:30 pm

June 4 @ 6:00 pm

Lauren Weisberger reads from her new book When Life Gives You Lululemons

New York Times bestselling author Lauren Weisberger returns with a novel starring one of her favorite characters from The Devil Wears Prada—Emily Charlton, first assistant to Miranda Priestly, now a highly successful image consultant who’s just landed the client of a lifetime. Welcome to Greenwich, CT, where the lawns and the women are perfectly manicured, the Tito’s and sodas are extra strong, and everyone has something to say about the infamous new neighbor. Let’s be clear: Emily Charlton, Miranda Priestly’s ex-assistant, does not do the suburbs. She’s working in Hollywood as an image consultant to the stars, but recently, Emily’s lost a few clients. She’s hopeless with social media. The new guard is nipping at her heels. She needs a big opportunity, and she needs it now.

Start: June 4 @ 6:00 pm
End: June 4 @ 7:30 pm

July 11 @ 6:00 pm

Elyssa Friedland launches her new book The Intermission

Start: July 11 @ 6:00 pm
End: July 11 @ 7:30 pm

September 5 @ 6:00 pm

Heather Miller launches her debut Prime-Time Parenting

A two-hour school-night routine that helps parents support their children’s social, emotional and intellectual development

School nights are a real challenge for most parents. Just as your energy flags, a slew of parenting duties loom ahead. Learn how to create a two-hour school night routine that works for both parent and child. By following this two-hour ritual, you’ll be able to:

  • Bond with your children
  • Prepare and enjoy a nutritious dinner
  • Support your child’s organization and academic success
  • Read with your child
  • Follow a book-bath-bed routine to an early bedtime
  • Enjoy some “me” time once the kids are in bed

The benefits of Prime-Time Parenting include better nutrition, better school performance, a more organized home, and well-rested parents and children.

The hours between 6 and 8pm will never be the same!

Start: September 5 @ 6:00 pm
End: September 5 @ 7:30 pm

September 11 @ 6:00 pm

Kate Walbert reads from her new novel His Favorites

Set in the 1970s, His Favorites is the story of Jo, a teenaged girl who, after a catastrophic and scandalous accident, is sent away to a boarding school. There, she encounters Master Aikens, a charismatic English teacher who encourages her to apply to his sought-after Modern Lit class. Intrigued, Jo agrees. The consequences for Jo are disastrous, immediate and lifelong. His Favorites beautifully shows how the institution closes ranks and protects Aikens when Jo brings his crimes to light, and the very steep price she must pay for being among his favorites.

The silencing of Jo and the underlying complicity of the culture in which she finds herself are all-too familiar and universal. As she recalls the details of the past many years later, she negotiates varying angles of perception, memory, revision, and the limits of language to try to claim and fully voice her history. The result is a devastating, propulsive, unforgettable work of fiction, impossible to put down.

Start: September 11 @ 6:00 pm
End: September 11 @ 7:30 pm

September 12 @ 6:00 pm

Please join us for the launch of Patrizia Chen’s new book Goong-Goong

Marrying into a Chinese family, Patrizia was fascinated and puzzled by the myriad of photographs of old Shanghai; the elegant weddings, exclusive club-like settings, sumptuous homes, banquets, and expensive cars. Inquisitive, she fielded questions, began to collect information, and discovered that she had married into an extraordinarily influential and important Chinese family. Yet… no one knew about the stories. Only her father-in-law, shipping magnate C.Y. Chen (or Goong-Goong, as she always respectfully referred to him) was the key to unlocking the family history.

Though rebuffed at first; in the years to come, the one prickly relationship between inquisitive Patrizia and reserved Goong-Goong warmed to become one of profound joy and deep meaning. Patrizia knew that she had to write the story of this remarkable man and the family that took her in with open arms; about exotic traditions; about fascinating people, places, anecdotes and stories–the stuff of novels–that proved to be real once she began to study the history of the Chen family and the meeting of East and West. Chen shows how families may change but can still preserve their traditions.

Goong-Goong is a unique book, which represents a fascinating cultural bridge between two civilizations and spanning two centuries.

Start: September 12 @ 6:00 pm
End: September 12 @ 7:30 pm
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