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May 16 @ 6:00 pm

Peter Van Buren reads from his new book Hooper’s War

A historical novel with strong contemporary resonance, Hooper’s War is set in WWII Japan. Protagonist Lieutenant Nate Hooper is a composite of too many men and women who have experienced the horror of war; he isn’t sure he’ll survive, and if he does make it home, he isn’t sure he can survive the peace. He’s done a terrible thing, and struggles to resolve the mistake he made alongside a Japanese soldier, and a Japanese woman who failed to save both men. At stake? Their souls.

Van Buren writes about the experiences of those who have lived through wartimes with insight and empathy. He is a 24-year veteran of the State Department, and in researching this book came to know a number of veterans through an anonymous group and, under the same conditions, spoke more intimately with men and women he lived alongside during a year he was in Iraq as an embed which is chronicled in his first book We Meant Well.  Fluent in Japanese, Van Buren also interviewed elderly Japanese citizens who lived through WWII as civilians. He found that a lot of their pain festers not just out of what they saw and did, but the realization that what they saw and did really didn’t matter in the bigger picture. It should’ve had a justification. Some explained they came to think of moral injury like taking apart a jigsaw puzzle. They thought and thought and while they couldn’t say exactly when, at some point they couldn’t see the whole picture anymore.  

Start: May 16 @ 6:00 pm
End: May 16 @ 7:30 pm

May 23 @ 6:00 pm

Benjamin Taylor reads from his new book The Hue and the Cry At Our House

After John F. Kennedy’s speech in front of the Hotel Texas in Fort Worth on November 22, 1963, he was greeted by, among others, an 11-year-old Benjamin Taylor and his mother waiting to shake his hand. Only a few hours later, Taylor’s teacher called the class in from recess and, through tears, told them of the president’s assassination. From there Taylor traces a path through the next twelve months, recalling the tumult as he saw everything he had once considered stable begin to grow more complex. Looking back on the love and tension within his family, the childhood friendships that lasted and those that didn’t, his memories of summer camp and family trips, he reflects upon the outsized impact our larger American story had on his own.

Start: May 23 @ 6:00 pm
End: May 23 @ 7:30 pm

August 30 @ 6:00 pm

Govind Ramakrishnan launches his debut collection of poetry My World in Fifty Words

My World In Fifty Words is written with the hope that it takes you for a ride around the world as seen through my eyes, where you get to enjoy the multicultural immersions that come with it. It chronicles a personal journey from childhood to today, and serves as a canvas to express my thoughts, emotions and observations.

Govind is a sophomore at Trinity School in New York. He is also the founder of a non-profit organization: Youth Against Sexual Assault (YASA) . Govind has attended Oxford and Cambridge Universities in the summers of 2014 and 2015 studying Economics and Computer Science. He is deeply interested in studying the classics and is focused on Latin and Sanskrit. Govind is learning classical Indian Carnatic music and Shaolin Kung Fu. He is also a contributing writer to Opus Media, one of UK’s leading publishing and media companies. In his spare time, he writes spiritual poetry and works on Carnatic/jazz fusion music.

Start: August 30 @ 6:00 pm
End: August 30 @ 7:30 pm
Venue: The Corner Bookstore
Address:
1313 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10128 United States

September 11 @ 6:00 pm

Brooke Kroeger reads from her new book The Suffragents

The Suffragents is the untold story of how some of New York’s most powerful men formed the Men’s League for Woman Suffrage, which grew between 1909 and 1917 from 150 founding members into a force of thousands across thirty-five states. Brooke Kroeger explores the formation of the League and the men who instigated it to involve themselves with the suffrage campaign, what they did at the behest of the movement’s female leadership, and why. She details the National American Woman Suffrage Association’s strategic decision to accept their organized help and then to deploy these influential new allies as suffrage foot soldiers, a role they accepted with uncommon grace. Led by such luminaries as Oswald Garrison Villard, John Dewey, Max Eastman, Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, and George Foster Peabody, members of the League worked the streets, the stage, the press, and the legislative and executive branches of government. In the process, they helped convince waffling politicians, a dismissive public, and a largely hostile press to support the women’s demand. Together, they swayed the course of history.

Start: September 11 @ 6:00 pm
End: September 11 @ 7:00 pm

September 12 @ 6:00 pm

Cherise Wolas reads from her debut The Resurrection of Joan Ashby

I viewed the consumptive nature of love as a threat to serious women. But the wonderful man I just married believes as I do—work is paramount, absolutely no children—and now love seems to me quite marvelous.

These words are spoken to a rapturous audience by Joan Ashby, a brilliant and intense literary sensation acclaimed for her explosively dark and singular stories.

When Joan finds herself unexpectedly pregnant, she is stunned by Martin’s delight, his instant betrayal of their pact. She makes a fateful, selfless decision then, to embrace her unintentional family. Challenged by raising two precocious sons, it is decades before she finally completes her masterpiece novel. Poised to reclaim the spotlight, to resume the intended life she gave up for love, a betrayal of Shakespearean proportion forces her to question every choice she has made.

Epic, propulsive, incredibly ambitious, and dazzlingly written, The Resurrection of Joan Ashby is a story about sacrifice and motherhood, the burdens of expectation and genius. Cherise Wolas’s gorgeous debut introduces an indelible heroine candid about her struggles and unapologetic in her ambition.

Start: September 12 @ 6:00 pm
End: September 12 @ 7:30 pm

September 14 @ 6:00 pm

Lily Tuck in conversation with the editor of her new novel Sisters

Lily Tuck’s critically lauded, bestselling I Married You for Happiness was hailed by the Boston Globe as “an artfully crafted still life of one couple’s marriage.” In her singular new novel Sisters, Tuck gives a very different portrait of marital life, exposing the intricacies and scandals of a new marriage sprung from betrayal. Tuck’s unnamed narrator lives with her new husband, his two teenagers, and the unbanishable presence of his first wife—known only as she. Obsessed with her, our narrator moves through her days presided over by the all-too-real ghost of the first marriage, fantasizing about how the first wife lives her life. Will the narrator ever equal she intellectually, or ever forget the betrayal that lies between them? And what of the secrets between her husband and she, from which the narrator is excluded? The daring and precise buildup to an eerily wonderful conclusion is a triumph of subtlety and surprise.

 

Lily Tuck will be in conversation with her editor, Elisabeth Schmitz

Start: September 14 @ 6:00 pm
End: September 14 @ 7:30 pm

September 26 @ 6:00 pm

A.F. Brady launches her debut novel The Blind

Sam James has spent years carefully crafting her reputation as the best psychologist at Typhlos, Manhattan’s most challenging psychiatric institution. She believes if she can’t save herself, she’ll save someone else. It’s this savior complex that serves her well in helping patients battle their inner demons, though it leads Sam down some dark paths and opens her eyes to her own mental turmoil.

When Richard, a mysterious patient no other therapist wants to treat, is admitted to Typhlos, Sam is determined to unlock his secrets and his psyche. But she can’t figure out why Richard appears to be so normal in a hospital filled with madness. As Sam gets pulled into Richard’s twisted past, she can’t help but analyze her own life, and what she discovers terrifies her. And so the mind games begin. But who is the savior and who is the saved?

In this unexpected and addictive psychological debut, A.F. Brady takes readers into the psyche of a deeply disturbed woman desperately trying to keep her head above water, showing that sometimes what’s most terrifying is what exists in your mind.

Start: September 26 @ 6:00 pm
End: September 26 @ 7:30 pm

September 27 @ 6:00 pm

Annalena McAfee in conversation with Christopher Buckley about her new novel Hame

Start: September 27 @ 6:00 pm
End: September 27 @ 7:30 pm

October 5 @ 6:00 pm

Please join us for the launch of Jenny Fran Davis’ debut Everything Must Go

Flora Goldwasser has fallen in love. She won’t admit it to anyone, but something about Elijah Huck has pulled her under. When he tells her about the hippie Quaker school he attended in the Hudson Valley called Quare Academy, where he’ll be teaching next year, Flora gives up her tony upper east side prep school for a life on a farm, hoping to woo him. A fish out of water, Flora stands out like a sore thumb in her vintage suits among the tattered tunics and ripped jeans of the rest of the student body. When Elijah doesn’t show up, Flora must make the most of the situation and will ultimately learn more about herself than she ever thought possible.

Told in a series of letters, emails, journal entries and various ephemera, Jenny Fran Davis’ Everything Must Go lays out Flora’s dramatic first year for all to see, embarrassing moments and all.

Start: October 5 @ 6:00 pm
End: October 5 @ 7:30 pm

October 11 @ 6:00 pm

Please join us for the launch of The Shattered Lens with author Jonathan Alpeyrie

Discover a gripping and harrowing tale of war and torture from the man who lived it in this powerful memoir by the celebrated war journalist who not only documented over a dozen conflict zones worldwide but was also captured and held hostage by Syrian rebels in 2013.
Capturing history was Jonathan Alpeyrie’s job but he never expected to become a news story himself. For a decade, the French‑American photojournalist had weaved in and out of over a dozen conflict zones. He photographed civilians being chased out of their homes, military trucks roving over bullet‑torn battlefields, and too many bodies to count. But on April 29, 2013, during his third assignment to Syria, Alpeyrie was betrayed by his fixer and handed over to a band of Syrian rebels.
For eighty‑one days he was bound, blindfolded, and beaten. Not too far away, President Bashar al‑Assad’s forces and those in opposition continued their bitter and bloody civil war. Over the course of his captivity, Alpeyrie kept his spirits up and strived to see, without his camera lenses, the humanity in his captors. He took part in their activities, taught them how to swim, prayed with them, and tried learning their language and culture. He also discovered a dormant faith within himself, one that strengthened him throughout the ordeal.

Jonathan Alpeyrie will be in conversation with co-author Stash Luczkiw

Start: October 11 @ 6:00 pm
End: October 11 @ 7:30 pm
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